An abandoned administrative building in the woods

I recently went for a hike in a forrest near Vienna. The area is known to be sparsely inhabited and generally, you won't encounter many people there. The next road is a few miles away and there's basically no touristic infrastructure nearby.

After I hiked for almost 45 minutes, I saw something above the treetops that looked like the remains of a tower that could have belonged to an ancient castle. But as I went closer, I discovered that those belonged to an old and abandoned building.

Abandoned structure in the woods

Abandoned structure in the woods

The inside of the building has been taken back by nature. Trees grow everywhere inside. I just love that. It's so impressive to see how nature takes back such buildings.

Trees growing inside

Trees growing inside

There's not much left of this building except the walls. It looks like this building once had three floors and I could see the remains of a former stairwell.

Inside the abandoned building

Inside the abandoned building

One of the most important rules in such abandoned places is to always look up if there's something that could come down.

Tree on the stairs

Tree on the stairs

All photos were taken using ProCamera App. As I didn't have the tripod with me, I used a neat feature of ProCamera App: The motion detection shutter release. I set ProCamera to manual mode with ISO set as low as possible to achieve at least a shutter speed of 1/20. With the motion detection shutter release of ProCamera the shutter will only trigger (automatically) once you hold your iPhone steady. Nice feature.

Back home, I did some research. It looks like this building once belonged to a former factory that was built towards the end of the 19th century and was used until the end of World War II. So the building is a little over 100 years old and has been abandoned almost 75 years ago. Quite impressive how fast nature takes back, isn't it?

If you've been following my blog for a while, you know that I have a soft spot for lost places and abandoned structures. You can read more about lost places I've discovered and photographed in the blog.